Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
Home | About us | Current Issue | Archives | Ahead of Print | Submission | Instructions | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact | Login 
    Users online: 2469 Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this article Email this article Bookmark this page
Search Again
 Back
 Table of Contents
 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Article Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert
 Add to My List
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed786    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded50    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

 
CASE REPORT
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 732-733

Aphagia in frontal lobe syndrome following traumatic brain injury: Delightful lessons from olanzapine treatment


1 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur; Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia
2 Department of Community and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia
3 Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Fatimah Ahmedy
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Jalan UMS, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah
Malaysia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_334_19

Rights and Permissions

A case of persistent aphagia in frontal lobe syndrome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) with successful use of olanzapine to improve the eating disorder is presented. A 20-year-old man suffered a severe TBI with right frontal intracerebral haemorrhage At four-month post-TBI, he had agitation, concurrent apathy with constant refusal for oral swallow despite gustatory sensory stimulation, hence the needs for nasogastric tube (NGT) feeding. He was diagnosed with frontal lobe syndrome and prescribed olanzapine 5mg daily that was optimised to 10mg due to worsened aggression. One month later, the aggression reduced with gradual improvement in oral intake. Percutaneous enterogastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion was cancelled and the NGT was sucessfully removed. Olanzapine prescription in this case improved aggression and aphagia simultaneously. Although olanzapine is proven beneficial and surgical intervention for long-term enteral feeding was avoided in this case, its usage requires judicious judgement.



[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*

        

Print this article         Email this article