Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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 Table of Contents    
LETTERS TO EDITOR  
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 591
COVID-19: Survey of doctors


1 National Institute of Nursing Education, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, BRAMHA Hospital and ASSSAN Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neurotoxicology, Psychopharmacology Unit, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

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Date of Submission13-Aug-2020
Date of Acceptance21-Sep-2020
Date of Web Publication10-Oct-2020
 

How to cite this article:
Sharma N, Soni AB, Andrade C. COVID-19: Survey of doctors. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:591

How to cite this URL:
Sharma N, Soni AB, Andrade C. COVID-19: Survey of doctors. Indian J Psychiatry [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Oct 24];62:591. Available from: https://www.indianjpsychiatry.org/text.asp?2020/62/5/591/297782




Sir,

We compliment Chatterjee et al.[1] for studying attitude, practice, behavior, and mental health impact of COVID-19 in doctors in West Bengal. We are concerned, however, that their sample of 152 subjects, not stratified for any important population demographic, is unlikely to be representative of the tens of thousands of doctors who practice in the state. Furthermore, because the sample was obtained through E-mails and appeals on social media, and not through a recognized method of sampling, there could have been substantial sampling bias that would compromise the validity of the study. This method of sampling also does not have a clearly defined sampling frame, and so it is unclear to what population the results of the study can be generalized.

We are also concerned that the authors appear to have used the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS)-21 as a diagnostic instrument with no validated cutoffs stated in their paper. Thus, for example, their categorization of respondents into depressed and nondepressed categories lacks validity. Finally, although the DASS-21 has 3 subscales, the authors reported a single value of Cronbach's alpha for the instrument; they should have reported Cronbach's alpha for each subscale separately because this test of internal consistency assumes unidimensionality in the items of the scale.[2]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Chatterjee SS, Bhattacharyya R, Bhattacharyya S, Gupta S, Das S, Banerjee BB. Attitude, practice, behavior, and mental health impact of COVID-19 on doctors. Indian J Psychiatry 2020;62:257-65.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Tavakol M, Dennick R. Making sense of Cronbach's alpha. Int J Med Educ 2011;2:53-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
    

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Correspondence Address:
Nitasha Sharma
National Institute of Nursing Education, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_980_20

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