Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 62  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 30-35

Do individuals follow up with mental health services after a suicide attempt? Findings from the assertive management of attempted suicide service, Bengaluru, India


1 Department of Psychiatry, St John's Medical College Hospital, Koramangala, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Division of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Population Health, St. John's Research Institute, Koramangala, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Priya Sreedaran
Department of Psychiatry, St John'fs Medical College, Bengaluru - 560 034, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_485_18

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Objective: There is limited information from India on whether individuals follow up with mental health services after a suicide attempt. The objective of this study was to determine follow-up rates after a suicide attempt with mental health services of those individuals treated as part of the assertive management of attempted suicide service in a general hospital in Bengaluru, India. Materials and Methods: Records from 284 persons from January 2016 to December 2016 were analyzed to ascertain their follow-up rates with mental health services after a suicide attempt. Results: After discharge, 25% individuals followed up on a single occasion with mental health services. Individuals with a psychiatric diagnosis were significantly more likely to follow up with mental health services as compared to those without a psychiatric diagnosis (P < 0.011, odds ratio: 2.875, confidence interval at 95%: 1.276–6.481). 90.8% were contacted through telephone as part of aftercare. Conclusions: Most individuals in India, especially those without a psychiatric diagnosis, do not follow up with mental health services after a suicide attempt. Periodic telephonic contacts are a useful aftercare strategy to reach out to this high-risk population. Limitation of this study is that findings are from an urban general hospital setting.



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