Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 61  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 45-52

Are emotion recognition deficits in patients with schizophrenia states or traits? A 6-month follow-up study


1 Department of Psychiatry, Bakirkoy Prof. Dr. Mazhar Osman Mental Health and Neurological Disease Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey
2 Department of Psychiatry, Cerrahpasa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey
3 Department of Psychiatry, Erenkoy Mental Health and Neurological Disease Trainig and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sakir Gica
Department of Psychiatry, Bakirkoy Prof. Dr. Mazhar Osman Mental Health and Neurological Disease Training and Research Hospital, H3 Section, Zuhuratbaba Mah. Dr. Tevfik Saglam Cad, No: 25/2 Posta Kodu 34147, Istanbul
Turkey
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_307_18

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Background: Patients with schizophrenia were found to be less successful at emotion recognition tasks (ERTs) than healthy individuals. There is a debate surrounding whether this deficit is permanent or temporary. The current study aims to assess how emotion recognition skills are affected by treatment processes and during the course of the disease and also to determine the relation of this change with clinical assessment scales, other cognitive functions, and quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four inpatients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia have been included in the study. Patients were assessed before beginning clozapine and 6 months later. During both assessments, clinical evaluation scales (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning), Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) for schizophrenia which is used for assessment of cognitive functions were used. Electroencephalography (EEG) monitorings were performed only once before treatment. In this study, CANTAB ERT was used for emotion recognition. Results: There was no statistically significant change in the emotion recognition when the first and final ERTs were compared. There was a moderately positive relationship between emotional recognition and functioning (r = 0.65, P < 0.05). Cognitive functions such as visual memory, attention, flexible thinking, and planning were found to be in correlation with emotion recognition. Furthermore, slow waves such as delta and theta activities obtained from frontal, temporoparietal, and occipital regions were associated with emotion recognition. Conclusion: The current study supports that emotion recognition deficits are long-term stable features of schizophrenia, slow-wave electrical activity in the frontal, temporoparietal, and occipital areas in QEEG, and cognitive functions such as visual memory, attention, flexible thinking, and planning are found to be correlated with emotion recognition.



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