Indian Journal of PsychiatryIndian Journal of Psychiatry
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CASE REPORT
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 51  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 206-208

Catatonia and multiple pressure ulcers: A rare complication in psychiatric setting


1 Departments of Psychiatric and Neurological Rehabilitation, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India
2 Department of Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
Abhishek Srivastava
Department of Psychiatric and Neurological Rehabilitation, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0019-5545.55091

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The incidence of pressure ulcers in patients with psychiatric illness, especially with catatonia might be more than what is reported in the literature. We report a case of catatonia secondary to severe depression presenting with multiple pressure ulcers. Single case report - description and management. An 18 yrs old boy reported with a continuous course illness characterized by features of catatonia secondary to severe depression with multiple pressure ulcers over sacrum and heels. Ulcers were effectively managed by a multidisciplinary team of physiatrist, psychiatrist, and rehabilitation nurses. Immobility, reduced nocturnal movements, increased skin fragility, and poor nutrition contribute to the development of the pressure ulcer in bed-bound psychiatric patients. Efforts should be directed toward the prevention of pressure ulcers in these patients to reduce additional morbidity.



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